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Version: 20.04

Stream connectors

Centreon Broker provides a stream connector. If no suitable connector is found among those provided then surely this stream connector will match your needs. Its principle is to expose a part of Centreon Broker API through the Lua interpreter and the user has just to fill it with his needs.

The exposed Centreon Broker

Here is the minimal acceptable Lua code to work as stream connector:

  function init(conf)
end

function write(d)
return true
end

We recommand to put Lua scripts in the /usr/share/centreon-broker/lua directory. If it does not exist, we can create it. Just be careful that directory to be accesible for the centreon-broker user. If a stream connector is composed of several files (a main script and a module for example), you can put them in that directory. If a dynamic library (\*.so file) is used by a Lua script, put it in the /usr/share/centreon-broker/lua/lib directory.

When Centreon Broker starts, it initializes all the configured connectors. For the stream connector, it loads the Lua script, checks its syntax and verifies that the init() and write() functions exist.

Centreon Broker checks also if a function filter(category, element) exists.

Let's focus on those functions. init function is called when the connector is initialized. The argument provided to this function is a Lua table containing information given by the user in the Centreon web output broker configuration interface. For example, if an IP address is provided with the name address and the value 192.168.1.18, then this information will be accessible through conf["address"].

The write() function is called each time an event is received from a poller through the broker. This event is configured to be sent to this connector. This function needs one argument which is the event translated as a Lua table.

The write() must return a boolean that is true if the events are processed and false otherwise.

If this function does not return a boolean, Broker will rise an error.

The Broker Lua SDK

To simplify Lua developer's life, several objects are proposed and directly available to the script.

The broker_log object

  1. broker_log:set_parameters(level, filename) allows the user to set a log level and a file name. The level is an integer from 1 to 3, from the more important to the less one. The file name must contain the full path. And the file must be accessible to centreon-broker. If this method is not called, then logs will be written in the centreon broker logs.
  2. broker_log:info(level, content) writes a log information if the given level is less or equal to the one configured. The content is the text to write in the logs.
  3. broker_log:warning(level, content) works like log_info but writes a warning.
  4. broker_log:error(level, content) works like log_info but writes an error.

Here is an example:

  function init(conf)
-- Here, we allow all logs with level 3 and set the output to
-- /tmp/test.log.
broker_log:set_parameters(3, "/tmp/test.log")
end

function write(d)
-- For each entry, we write the key and the value.
for k,v in pairs(d) do
broker_log:info(3, k .. " => " .. tostring(v))
end
return true
end

Here, when the init function is executed, the broker_log object is parametrized with a max level 3 and an output file /tmp/test.log.

Then on each write() call, events received are logged as info. We get a result like this:

  Fri Jan 26 08:31:49 2018: INFO: service_id => 21
Fri Jan 26 08:31:49 2018: INFO: type => 0
Fri Jan 26 08:31:49 2018: INFO: host_id => 13
Fri Jan 26 08:31:49 2018: INFO: element => 1
Fri Jan 26 08:31:49 2018: INFO: comment_data =>

To use a method in Lua, the separator between the object and the method is : ; broker_log is an object since it contains informations such as the max level or the destination file.

The TCP broker socket

A basic TCP socket is available in the Broker SDK. A simple example is the following:

  local socket = broker_tcp_socket.new()
socket:connect("10.40.1.2", 9002)
socket:write(message)
answer = socket:read()
socket:close()
  1. In this example, the first call is broker_tcp_socket.new(). It creates a new socket by calling the function new() stored in the table broker_tcp_socket.
  2. The next step is a call to the connect method that needs two arguments: a string given an ip or a host name to connect to and the port to use.
  3. The next step is a call to the write method that writes a string into the socket. The method call is finished when the entire message is sent.
  4. The read method gets a string as result.
  5. When the user finishes using the socket, he can close the socket with the close() method.

This socket object also provides a method get_state() that returns a string:

  1. unconnected: the socket is not connected
  2. hostLookup: the socket is performing a host name lookup
  3. connecting: the socket has started establishing a connection
  4. connected: a connection is established
  5. closing: the socket is about to close (data may still be waiting to be written).

The broker table

Several functions are available in this table. These functions are not methods, broker is just a table containing them. We can find here:

  1. json_encode(object) that converts into json a Lua object. The json is returned as string by the function.
  2. json_decode(json) that converts into Lua object a json string. The object is directly returned by the method. A second value is also returned. it is only defined when an error occured and contains a string describing the error.
  3. parse_perfdata(str) that takes as argument a string containing perfdata. A second boolean argument is available. If it is true, the returned table is larger and gives all the details on the metrics as well as the warning and critical thresholds. On success it returns a table containing the values retrieved from the perfdata. On failure it returns a nil object and an error description string.
  4. url_encode(text) that converts the string text into an url encoded string.
  5. stat(filename) that calls the system stat function on the file. On success we get a table containing various informations about the file (see example below). Otherwise, this table is nil and a second return value is given containing an error message.
  local obj = {
a = 1,
b = 2,
c = { 'aa', 'bb', 'cc' }
}
local json = broker.json_encode(obj)
print(json)

that returns

  { "a": 1, "b": 2, "c": [ 'aa', 'bb', 'cc' ] }

A second example is the following:

  local json = { "a": 1, "b": 2, "c": [ 'aa', 'bb', 'cc' ] }
local obj, err = broker.json_decode(json)

for i,v in pairs(obj) do
print(i .. " => " .. tostring(v))
end

should return something like this:

  a => 1
b => 2
c => table: 0x12ef67b5

In this case (no error), err is nil.

It is also easy to access to each field of the object, for example: obj['a'] gives 1, or obj['c'][1] gives aa, or obj.b gives 2.

Here is an example showing the possibilities of the parse_perfdata function.

  local perf, err_str = broker.parse_perfdata(" 'one value'=2s;3;5;0;9 'a b c'=3.14KB;0.8;1;0;10")

if perf then
for i,v in pairs(perf) do
print(i .. " => " .. tostring(v))
end
else
print("parse_perfdata error: " .. err_str)
end

should return something like this:

  a b c => 3.14
one value => 2

If now, we call the same function with true as second argument:

  local perf, err_str = broker.parse_perfdata("pl=45%;40;80;0;100", true)

if perf then
print("Content of 'pl'")
for i,v in pairs(perf['pl']) do
print(i .. " => " .. tostring(v))
end
else
print("parse_perfdata error: " .. err_str)
end

should return something like this:

  Content of 'pl'
value => 45
uom => %
min => 0
max => 100
warning_low => 0
warning_high => 40
warning_mode => false
critical_low => 0
critical_high => 80
critical_mode => false

Be careful, keys are not sorted in hash tables, so if you make a such program, you will probably not have data in the same order.

  local str = broker.url_encode("La leçon du château de l'araignée")
print(str)

should return something like this:

  La%20le%C3%A7on%20du%20ch%C3%A2teau%20de%20l%27araign%C3%A9e
  local s, err = broker.stat("filename")
for i,v in pairs(perf['pl']) do
print(i .. " => " .. tostring(v))
end

should return something like this:

  uid=>1000
gif=>1000
size=>279
ctime=>1587641144
mtime=>1587641144
atime=>1587641144

If an error occurs, s is nil whereas err contains a string containing an error message.

The broker_cache object

This object provides several methods to access the cache. Among data, we can get hostnames, etc...

The functions described here need the cache to be filled. It is important for that to enable the NEB events, otherwise those functions will just return nil. The cache is filled when an engine restarts.

The available methods are:

  1. get_ba(ba_id) that gets ba informations from its id. This function returns a table if found or nil otherwise.
  2. get_bv(bv_id) that gets bv informations from its id. This function returns a table if found or nil otherwise.
  3. get_bvs(ba_id) that gets all the bv containing the ba of id ba_id. This function returns an array of bv ids, potentially empty if no bv are found.
  4. get_hostgroup_name(id) that gets from the cache the host group name of the given id. This function returns a string or nil otherwise.
  5. get_hostgroups(host_id) that gets the list of host groups containing the host corresponding to host_id. The return value is an array of objects, each one containing two fields, group_id and group_name.
  6. get_hostname(id) that gets from the cache the host name corresponding to the given host id. This function returns a string with the host name or nil otherwise.
  7. get_index_mapping(index_id) that gets from the cache the index mapping object of the given index id. The result is a table containing three keys, index_id, host_id and service_id.
  8. get_instance_name(instance_id) that gets from the cache the instance name corresponding to the instance id.
  9. get_metric_mapping(metric_id) that gets from the cache the metric mapping object of the given metric id. The result is a table containing two keys, metric_id and index_id.
  10. get_service_description(host_id,service_id) that gets from the cache the service description of the given pair host_id / service_id. This function returns a string or nil otherwise.
  11. get_servicegroup_name(id) that gets from the cache the service group name of the given id. This function returns a string or nil* otherwise.
  12. get_servicegroups(host_id, service_id) that gets the list of service groups containing the service corresponding to the pair host_id / service_id. The return value is an array of objects, each one containing two fields, group_id and group_name.
  13. get_notes(host_id[,service_id]) that gets the notes configured in the host or service. The service_id is optional, if given we want notes from a service, otherwise we want notes from a host. If the object is not found in cache, nil is returned.
  14. get_notes_url(host_id[, service_id]) that gets the notes url configured in the host or service. The service_id is optional, if given we want notes url from a service, otherwise we want it from a host. If the object is not found in cache, nil is returned.
  15. get_action_url(host_id) that gets the action url configured in the host or service. The service_id is optional, if given we want action url from a service, otherwise we want it from a host. If the object is not found in cache, nil is returned.
  16. get_severity(host_id[,service_id]) that gets the severity of a host or a service. If you only provide the host_id, we suppose you want to get a host severity. If a host or a service does not have any severity, the function returns a nil value.

The init() function

This function must not be defined as local, otherwise it will not be detected by centreon broker.

Imagine we have made such configuration:

image

with two custom entries:

  1. a string elastic-address with 172.17.0.1 as content.
  2. a number elastic-port with 9200 as content.

Then, the init() function has access to them like this:

  function init(conf)
local my_address = conf['elastic-address']
local port = conf['elastic-port']
end

The write() function

This function must not be defined as local, otherwise it will not be seen by broker.

The only argument given to the write() function is an event. It is given with the same data as the ones we can see in Centreon Broker.

To classify the event, we have two data that are category and element. Those two informations are integers. If we concatenate those two numbers we obtain a longer integer equal to the event type also available in the event as _type.

intshortshort
_type =categoryelem

Sometimes, one can want the hostname corresponding to an event but he only gets the host_id. It is possible to get it thanks to the broker_cache:get_hostname(id) method.

For example:

  function write(d)
if d.category == 3 and d.element == 1 then
local hostname = broker_cache:get_hostname(d.host_id)
if hostname then
broker_log:info("host name "
.. hostname .. " corresponds to host id " .. d.host_id)
else
-- Unable to get the name, we wait for the next time, wishing
-- the cache will contain the name. And so return 0
return true
end
end
-- Here, we can add the event processing...

return true
end

The write function return value is a boolean. While this value is false, Broker keeps the sent events in memory and if needed in retention. When we are sure all events are processed, the idea is that write returns true and then Broker frees the events stack.

Behind this, it is possible to avoid to commit events one by one. The write function can stock them in a stack and return false, and when a given limit is reached, it can send all of them to their destination and return true.

The filter() function

The function must not be defined as local, otherwise it will not be detected by Centreon Broker.

It takes account of two parameters: category and element that we've already seen in the previous section. The category is an integer from 1 to 7, or the value 65535. The element gives details on the event, for example, for the category NEB, elements are Acknowledgement, Comment, etc... given as integers.

The flush() function

When Broker queue size reaches the max allowed size, it continues to fill this queue into a file and does not send anymore events to streams. While events in queue are not acknowledged, streams won't receive anymore events.

In several cases, this can lead to issues. The idea is that the stream has kept events in memory waiting for others events to send them to a database. But Broker queue is full and Broker does not call the stream's write function anymore since it writes events directly to its retention files waiting for an acknowledgement from the stream that won't arrive since write is not called.

The solution to fix this lock in Broker is a flush function called regularly by Broker that just asks to the stream to flush its data. This function returns a boolean that is true if the stream arrived to flush its queue. Once Broker receives an information of a flush success, it can newly call the stream write function.

  function write(d)
if d.category ~= 3 or d.element ~= 1 then
return false
end

-- We don't send data each time. We fill a queue and when it is full we
-- send its content with the flush() function.
queue[#queue + 1] = serialize(d)
local retval = false
if #queue > max_queue_size then
retval = flush()
end
-- Here, we return retval that is false except when flush has sent the
-- queue content.
return retval
end

function flush()
-- if the queue is empty, nothing to do and we can tell Broker to empty its
-- retention
if #queue == 0 then
return true
end

-- Here, we should write some code to send events stored in the queue.
--
-- ...
if success then
return true
else
return false
end
end

For details on types, categories and their id, see The BBDO protocol